Tag Archives: developer fees

It’s a Dark Day for ThumbSnail Studios…

I’m sure you’ve already heard the amazing news about ThumbSnail Studios and how it finally broke even and met its goal of being profitable enough to purchase one Safeway Select Chicken Bacon Alfredo Pizza (estimated retail value: $3.49 – $3.99).

However…

In what can only be the saddest development of all-time, it appears that Safeway has discontinued the greatest frozen pizza ever made.  Now, it’s possible that my local Safeway store has just stopped carrying it.  But… since I’ve, uh, checked at three different locations that are rather far apart, I fear for the worst.

Thus, my one and only goal will never truly be achieved…

My only hope now is that ThumbSnail Studios becomes profitable enough to afford a time machine so that I can go back in time and buy my favorite pizza.  That, however, seems too lofty a goal because I probably wouldn’t have $4 remaining after purchasing the time machine.  Therfore, the better course of action would be to go back in time and stop myself from becoming a developer in the first place.

The moral of this story is:

If there’s a frozen pizza that you like, do not become an app developer through Apple because the ~$110 in fees could instead be used to stock up on ~30 pizzas, thereby eliminating the future need to create a time machine.

Sigh…

But, in all seriousness, a big thank you to everyone who has bought one of my games!  I loved making them, and I hope you love playing them.

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Filed under Game Development, Super Hearts, Super Sevens

It’s a Glorious Day for ThumbSnail Studios!

Yes, that’s right, the unachieveable has been achieved, the impossible made possible.

Not only did ThumbSnail Studios just break even, ThumbSnail Studios is in the green.

What’s even more impressive is that if I:

-ignore my own purchase of my own game on Amazon through the use of Bing dollars
-ignore my own purchase of my own game on Amazon with Amazon coins
-ignore my own purchase of my own game on iTunes with leftover iTunes cash

ThumbSnail Studios is STILL IN THE GREEN.

Thus, my one goal has been reached!!!  Not only was I finally able to cover Apple’s developer fees, I actually have enough extra to buy one Safeway Select Chicken Bacon Alfredo Pizza.  (Even if it’s not on sale this week!)

A sincere “Thank you” goes out to everyone who has bought and played one of my games.  I really hope you’ve enjoyed them.

It truly is a glorious day!

Except

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Filed under Game Development, Super Hearts, Super Sevens

How To Make A Profitable First App

More than likely your first app is not going to be profitable.  Actually, more than likely all of your apps are not going to be profitable.  The developer fees alone make this goal unobtainable.  So what’s a rookie developer gotta do?

First of all, you must spend absolutely nothing during the development stage.  Anything you spend here will not be recovered.  This means all the tools you work with need to be free.  This mean you need to do everything by yourself (or know people willing to work for free).  This means you already need to own a computer (or have excellent ninja skills to stealthily hide in your local public library beyond closing hours for late-night coding sessions).

Best Spots to Hide in Public Library

I hope you can wall crawl…

 Now that you’ve wisely concluded to develop your first game at no (monetary) cost to yourself, you must decide which app store you’re going to publish your app to.  This is absolutely critical.  This choice alone will likely determine whether or not your game is profitable.  Here are your best three options:

#3.  The Apple App Store

Signing up for a developer account here will set you back a hundred dollars as well as whatever tax they charge.  So let’s just say the total cost to you is:  $110.  On top of that, Apple will take 30% of whatever you sell.  To put this into perspective, if you are selling your app for $0.99, you are going to need to sell 160 copies of your game just to break even.  Or if you sell your game for $1.99, you’ll need to sell 80 copies of your game.  That’s doable, right?  Hahahahahaha!  Sorry, I used to think like you.  But unless you have a hundred friends and an incredibly large family, this isn’t going to happen.

#2.  The Google Play Store

Signing up for a developer account here will set you back twenty-five dollars as well as (so I assume; I haven’t actually done this) whatever tax they charge.  So let’s just say the total cost to you is:  $27.50.  On top of that, Google will take 30% of whatever you sell.  To put this into perspective, if you are selling your app for $0.99, you are going to need to sell 40 copies of your game just to break even.  Or if you sell your game for $1.99, you’ll need to sell 20 copies of your game.  That’s much more doable, right?  Hahahahahaha!  Sorry, I used to think like you.  But unless you have a hundred friends and an incredibly large family, this isn’t going to happen.

#1.  The Amazon Appstore

Signing up for a developer account here will set you back… nothing!  No taxes, no fees, no cost!  Woo hoo!  Now, keep in mind that Amazon will still take 30% of whatever you sell.  But to put this into perspective, if you are selling your app for $0.99, you need to sell only one copy of your game to come away with a profit of $0.69!!!  Finally, something that’s doable!

Thus, the only way to make a profitable first app is to:
-spend no money on its development
-release it on the Amazon Appstore
-find one person in the universe to buy it

Best of luck!

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Filed under Develop an App for Free, Failed App Marketing Strategies, Game Development, New App Marketing Strategies